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Texas Municipal Tree Definitions
(Accuracy not guaranteed - please check with individual communities for updates)

 

Caliper

 

Baytown

means the diameter of a tree at 18 inches above ground level.

 

Beaumont

the measure of the diameter of a tree at eighteen (18) inches above grade.

 

Burleson

the diameter of the trunk of a tree measured 12 inches above the ground level.

 

Carrollton

diameter of the trunk of a tree measured 12 inches above grade.

 

Conroe

means the diameter of a single-trunk tree as measured six inches above the root collar for trees up to and including four inches in diameter and 12 inches above the root collar for trees having a larger diameter. The caliper of acceptable multiple trunk trees is determined by using the sum of the caliper of the three largest trunks.

 

Dallas

for a single-stem tree, the diameter of the trunk measured 12 inches above ground for a tree having a diameter up to and including eight inches, and measured at four and one-half feet above the ground for a tree having a diameter of more than eight inches. For multi-stem trees, the diameter of the trunk measured at the narrowest point below branching when branching occurs higher than 12 inches above the ground. When branching occurs at or lower than 12 inches above the ground, caliper means the diameter of the largest stem plus the average diameter of the remaining stems, measured at four and one-half feet above the ground.

 

Dickenson

shall mean the width of the trunk of a tree and shall be measured at four (4) inches to six (6) inches above grade. This measurement is used for measuring nursery stock and is only used for trees that are to be planted, relocated, or measure less than seven (7) inches in diameter at four (4) feet six (6) inches above grade.

 

Duncanville

the diameter of a tree trunk measured in inches at a height of 24 inches above natural grade. For a multi-trunk tree, the diameter shall be the total diameter of the largest trunk plus one-half of the diameter of each additional trunk.

 

Fort Worth

the diameter of a tree, measured at a point six (6) inches above the ground line if the resulting measurement is no more than four (4) inches. If the resulting measurement is more than four (4) inches, the measurement is made at a point twelve (12) inches above the ground line.

 

Helotes

mitigation trees: the diameter of a tree as measured six inches above the root collar; and existing, mature and large trees: the diameter of a tree as measured four and one-half feet above the natural grade for trees having a larger diameter.

 

Hidalgo

in reference to trees, means the average diameter of the tree measured from four feet above the ground.

 

Houston

means the minimum diameter of a tree as measured six inches above the ambient grade for trees up to and including four inches in diameter, 12 inches above the ambient grade for trees having a diameter exceeding four inches but not exceeding eight inches and 54 inches above the ambient grade for trees having a diameter greater than eight inches.

 

Hunters Creek Village

shall mean the diameter of a tree as measured at a point on the tree which is six inches (6") above the ambient grade.

 

Irving

the tree caliper shall be the method in which the city will measure tree size as required by this article. The caliper of any tree, either existing or proposed, shall be determined by measuring the trunk caliper (diameter) twelve (12) inches from the existing grade.

 

Lancaster

the diameter of a tree measured is as follows: Height to measure depends on size: 0-4 (zero to four inches), measured at 6 (six inches) from natural ground level. Trees 4 (four inches) to transplantable size are measured at 12 (twelve inches) from natural ground level. All others at 4.5 from the ground level in Diameter at Breast Height (*see ANSI standard).

 

Little Elm

the diameter of a tree trunk measured 12 inches above ground level. The caliper of a multi-trunk tree is determined by the full caliper of the largest trunk, plus half the caliper of the other trunks. This measurement used for newly planted trees.

 

Marble Falls

the diameter of a tree measured twelve (12) inches above the ground when planted.

 

McKinney

the diameter measurement of a tree trunk. Caliper of the trunk shall be measured six inches above the ground for trees up to and including four-inch caliper size, and 12 inches above the ground for larger sizes.

 

Port Aransas

any of various measuring instruments having two (2) usually adjustable arms, legs, or jaws used especially to measure diameter or thickness.

 

Richland Hills

means the average diameter measurement of the trunk of a tree. Caliper is to be measured at six inches above grade when a caliper of four inches or smaller is required, at 12 inches above grade when a caliper between four inches and 12 inches is required, and measured at full breast height (4 1/2 feet) when a caliper larger than 12 inches is required.

 

Roanoke

the diameter of the trunk of a tree measured twelve inches (12") above grade.

 

Rockwall

means the diameter of the trunk measured six (6) inches above ground level up to and including four-inch caliper size, and measured twelve (12) inches above ground level if the measurement taken at six (6) inches above ground level exceeds four (4) inches. If a tree is of a multi-trunk variety, the caliper of the tree is the average caliper of all of its trunks.

 

Round Rock

shall mean the American Association of Nurseymen standard for trunk measurement (diameter) for nursery stock. Caliper of the trunk shall be measured six (6) inches above the root ball for four-inch caliper size and small, and twelve (12) inches for above the root ball for larger sizes.

 

San Antonio

the minimum diameter of a tree measured six (6) inches above the root collar for trees up to and including four (4) inches in diameter; twelve (12) inches above the root collar for trees having a diameter greater than four (4) inches and up to twelve (12) inches; and four and one-half (4.5) feet above the root collar for trees having a diameter larger than twelve (12) inches.

 

Seabrook

means the diameter of a tree at four feet of height above ground level. If a tree trunk separates or splits below four feet of height, measurement to determine diameter shall be taken immediately below the point where the trunk separates or splits.

 

Stafford

means the minimum diameter of a tree as measured six inches above the root collar for trees up to and including four inches in diameter and twelve inches above the root collar for trees having a larger diameter.

 

Texarkana

is the diameter of a tree measured from six (6) inches above the ground for trees up to four (4) inches in diameter, twelve (12) inches above the ground for trees having a diameter of four (4) to twelve (12) inches, and four and one-half (4 1/2) feet above the ground for trees having a diameter larger than twelve (12) inches.

 

The Colony

the diameter of the trunk of a tree measured twelve (12) inches above ground level. If a tree is of a multi-trunk variety, the caliper of the tree is the sum of the largest trunk plus one-half ( 1/2) the caliper of the remaining trunks.

 

Canopy

 

Round Rock

shall mean the horizontal extension of a tree's branches in all directions from its trunk.

 

Circumference

 

Dickenson

shall mean the outermost measurement of a tree trunk and shall be measured four (4) feet six (6) inches above surrounding grade, using an ordinary tape measure. For multiple-trunk trees, the trunk circumference is deemed to equal the circumference of the largest trunk, plus one-half ( 1/2) the sum of all additional trunks at four (4) feet six (6) inch above grade. Measurements should be accurate to the nearest one-half ( 1/2) inch. To convert to diameter inches, divide circumference inches by 3.142.

 

Hedwig Village

means the circumference of a tree trunk measured three feet above the ground using an ordinary tape measure. Measurement height shall be taken just above or just below any unusual swells in the trunk as close as possible to the three foot level. For multiple tree trunks the circumference is equal to the circumference of the larger trunk plus one-half the circumference of other trunks.

 

Hunters Creek Village

shall mean the circumference of the trunk of a tree measured at a height of four and one-half feet (41/2') above the ground using an ordinary tape measure or diameter tape. Tree diameter in inches x 3.14 equals the circumference of a tree in inches. If the tree has unusual swells in the trunk at measurement height, measurement shall be taken either below or above the swell at the smallest trunk diameter as close to four and one-half (41/2') feet as possible.

 

League City

shall be measured 4 1/2 feet above the ground using an ordinary tape measure or diameter tape. Measurement is taken just above or below any unusual swells in the trunk, as closely as possible to the 4 1/2-foot level. For multiple-trunk trees, the trunk circumference is deemed to equal the circumference of the largest plus one-half the circumference of each additional trunk. Measurements should be accurate to the nearest one-half inch.

 

New Braunfels

is the distance around the trunk of a tree measured six inches above the ground for trees to be planted and four and one half feet above the ground for existing trees. In the case of multi-trunk trees, the trunk circumference of the tree as a whole is the sum of the circumferences of the two largest individual trunks.

 

Pearland

is measured four and one-half (4 1/2) feet above the ground using an ordinary tape measure or diameter tape. Measurement is taken just above or below any unusual swells in the trunk, as closely as possible to the four and one-half (4 1/2) foot level. For multiple-trunk trees, the trunk circumference is deemed to equal the circumference of the largest trunk plus half the circumference of each additional trunk. Measurements should be accurate to the nearest one-half ( 1/2) inch.

 

Rockport

means the circumference of a tree at D.B.H. (diameter at breast height, or 4 1/2 feet above the ground). Diameter is circumference divided by 3.142.

 

Spring Valley

shall mean circumference or diameter measured at a point on the tree 4 1/2 feet above the surrounding ground level. The equivalent tree circumference or diameter may be used for measurement purposes. Tree diameter in inches 3.14 = Tree Circumference in inches. (For example: 9" diameter 3.14 = 28.26 circumference). To measure a tree which forks or has two boles or stems at or below 4 1/2 feet, only the circumference or diameter of the larger bole or stem will be measured.

 

West University Place

of a tree means the circumference of its trunk, measured as prescribed in the criteria manual and in figure 1 attached to the criteria manual. For conversion to diameter, the circumference can be divided by 3.142.

 

Cleaning

 

El Paso

is the selective removal of dead, diseased, and/or broken branches. Cleaning is done at any time to reduce risk and remove the possibility of the movement of decay, insects or disease from dead or dying branches into the rest of the tree.

 

Mansfield

a vertical line run through the outermost portion of the canopy of a tree and extending to the ground.

 

Clear or Clearing

 

Conroe

means the removal or harvesting of trees not falling under the definition of under brushing.

 

Dallas

means any activity that removes or seriously injures one or more trees or the vegetative ground cover of one or more trees, such as root mat removal or topsoil removal.

 

Denton

means an intentional act to cut down, remove all or a substantial part of, or damage a tree or other vegetation that will cause the tree or other vegetation to decline and/or die. Clearing is defined to include, but not be limited to, chemical, physical, compaction, or grading damage. Clear-cutting is a clearing activity conducted over an entire lot.

 

McKinney

the removal of ten or more protected trees from a property within a 90-day period.

 

Round Rock

shall mean the act of cutting down, removing all or a substantial part of, or damaging a tree or other vegetation that will cause a tree to decline and/or die, which includes, but is not limited to, chemical, physical, compaction, or grading damage.

 

Clear-cutting

 

Carrollton

the indiscriminate removal of protected trees from a site or tract.

 

Duncanville

the indiscriminant removal of protected trees from a site or tract.

 

Kennedale

means the removal of all of the trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area.

 

Lancaster

the removal of all of the trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area of land.

 

Mansfield

the removal of all of the trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area.

 

North Richland Hills

means the removal of all trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area of land.

 

Oak Point

the removal of all of the trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area.

 

Roanoke

the indiscriminate removal of protected trees from a site or tract.

 

Weatherford

the removal of all of the trees or a significant majority of the trees within an area of land.

 

Critical Root Zone

 

Beaumont

a circular region measured outward from the tree trunk to the drip line representing the area of roots that must be maintained or protected for the tree's survival.

 

Bunker Hill Village

of a tree shall mean the area within a circle centered on the trunk location, the diameter of said circle being one-half of the sum of the longest and shortest drip line diameters.

 

Carrollton

the area of native soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line, as shown in section 155.11, Figure 2.

 

Coppell

means the top 12 inches of undisturbed natural soil around the tree, defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line, wherein roots critical to its survival are growing.

 

Dallas

means the circular area of ground surrounding a tree extending a distance of one foot per caliper inch of the tree, measured from the tree trunk or stem.

 

Denton

means a circular region measured outward from a tree trunk representing the essential area of the roots that must be maintained or protected for the tree's survival. A tree's critical root zone is measured as one (1) foot of radial distance outward from the trunk for every inch of tree DBH, and may be no less than a radius of eight (8) feet.

 

Duncanville

the area of native soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Fort Worth

area around the trunk of the tree that is equal to a radius of one (1) foot per inch diameter measured at breast height (DBH) four and one-half (4.5) feet.

 

Hedwig Village

means the area of a tree within a circle centered on the trunk location, the diameter of such circle being one-half the sum of the longest and shortest drip line diameters.

 

Hillshire Village

of a tree. The area within a circle centered on the trunk location, the diameter of said circle being one-half the sum of the longest and shortest drip line diameters.

 

Hunters Creek Village

means the area within the drip line of a tree. As a practical matter, this is the acute portion of the tree's root system. Approximately ninety percent (90%) of the tree's root mass occurs within the top three feet of the soil and most of the fine feeder roots which collect moisture and nutrients are located in the top six inches (6") of the soil. Typically, a tree's root system extends as much as two to three times the distance from the trunk to the drip line.

 

Kennedale

means the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Lancaster

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line. If CRZ is compromised by site conditions, such as but not limited to, roads, sidewalks, existing buildings, utility easements, etc., the CRZ will be determined by the Landscape Administrator or designee.

 

Little Elm

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Mansfield

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the dripline.

 

McKinney

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Oak Point

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Pearland

the area within the drip line of the tree. As a practical matter, this is the acute portion of the tree's root system. Approximately ninety-nine (99) percent of the tree's root mass occurs within the top three (3) feet of the soil and most of the fine feeder roots which collect moisture and nutrients are located in the top four (4) inches of the soil. Typically, a tree's root system extends as much as two (2) to three (3) times the distance from the trunk to the drip line.

 

Richland Hills

means the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line. 

 

Rockport

means, for any tree, the area within a circle centered on the location of the trunk. The circle's diameter is one-half the sum of the broadest and narrowest drip line diameters.

 

Round Rock

shall mean a circular region measured outward from the tree trunk representing the essential area of the roots that must be maintained or protected for the tree's survival. Critical Root Zone is one foot of radial distance for every inch of tree DBH.

 

Rowlett

means the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

Weatherford

the area of undisturbed natural soil around a tree defined by a concentric circle with a radius equal to the distance from the trunk to the outermost portion of the drip line.

 

West University Place

means, for any given tree, the area within a circle centered on the trunk location. The circle's diameter is one-half the sum of the broadest and the narrowest drip line diameters. See figure 1b attached to the criteria manual.

 

Critically Alter

 

Lancaster

uprooting or severing the main trunk of a tree, or any act which causes or may reasonably be expected to cause a tree to die. This includes, but is not limited to: damage inflicted upon the root system of a tree; a change in the natural grade above the root system of a tree, storage of materials, or the compaction of soil above the root system of a tree; an application of herbicidal chemical or the misapplication of beneficial chemicals; excessive pruning; placement of non-permeable pavement over the root system or a tree; or trenching within the primary root zone. Additionally, a tree may be considered critically altered if more than 25% of the primary root zone is altered or disturbed at natural grade, or more than 25% of the canopy is removed.

 

McKinney

uprooting or severing the main trunk of a tree, or any act which causes or may reasonably be expected to cause a tree to die. This includes, but is not limited to: damage inflicted upon the root system of a tree by machinery, storage of materials, or the compaction of soil above the root system of a tree; a change in the natural grade above the root system of a tree; an application of herbicidal chemical or the misapplication of beneficial chemicals; excessive pruning; placement of non-permeable pavement over the root system of a tree; or trenching within the primary root zone. Additionally, a tree may be considered critically altered if more than 25 percent of the primary root zone is altered or disturbed at natural grade, or more than 25 percent of the canopy is removed.

 

Roanoke

uprooting or severing the main trunk of a tree, or any act which causes or may reasonably be expected to cause a tree to die. This includes, but is not limited to: damage inflicted upon the root system of a tree by machinery, storage of materials, or the compaction of soil above the root system of a tree; a change in the natural grade above the root system of a tree; an application of herbicidal chemical(s) or the misapplication of beneficial chemical(s); excessive pruning; placement of impervious pavement over the root system of a tree; or trenching or boring within the critical root zone.

 

Crown

 

Addison

the upper portion of a tree or shrub from the lowest branch on the trunk of the tree to the highest or widest extending branch at the top or sides of the tree including all the leaves and branches of the tree or shrub.

 

Duncanville

in plan view, the nominal diameter of the foliage of the tree. The part of a tree which includes branches and leaves.

 

Cut and Fill

 

Mansfield

areas where the natural ground level has been excavated (cut) or fill brought in.

 

McKinney

areas where the natural ground level has been excavated (cut) or where fill material has been brought in. 

 

North Richland Hills

means the deposition of rock, concrete, soil or sod such that the cumulative thickness of all materials is equivalent to six inches or greater.

 

Oak Point

areas where the natural ground level has been excavated (cut) or fill brought in.

 

Weatherford

areas where the natural ground level has been excavated (cut) or fill has been brought in.